Dataset

Vote Cast for United States Representatives by Major Political Party--Congressional

Added By Infochimps

The Statistical Abstract files are distributed by the US Census Department as Microsoft Excel files. These files have data mixed with notes and references, multiple tables per sheet, and, worst of all, the table headers are not easily matched to their rows and columns.

A few files had extraneous characters in the title. These were corrected to be consistent. A few files have a sheet of crufty gibberish in the first slot. The sheet order was shuffled but no data were changed.

The tables that were changed (this is table 391):

0166 0257 0362 0429 0445 0446 0459 0461 0462 0464 0465 0466 0467
0469 0479 0480 0481 0482 0483 0484 0485 0486 0487 0559 0628 0629
1144 1227 1231

This dataset consists of a table of 485 rows and 10 columns.

In some States the Democratic and Republican vote includes votes cast for the party candidate by endorsing parties. FIPS=Federal Information Processing Standards

Footnotes

  1. No candidate.
  2. According to state law, it is not required to tabulate votes for unopposed candidates.
  3. Louisiana holds an open-primary election with candidates from
    all parties running on the same ballot. Any candidate who receives
    a majority is elected; if no candidate receives 50 percent, there
    is a run-off election in November between the top two finishers.
    A candidate who is unopposed is declared elected by the people and his/her name shall not appear
    on the ballot in either the Primary or General Election.
  4. On June 28, 2006, the U.S. Supreme Court declared that the Texas legislature’s redistricting plan
    violated the Voting Rights Act. As a result, on August 4, 2006,
    replacement district boundaries were announced for the 2006 election for the 15th, 21st, 23rd, 25th, and
    28th districts. On election day in November, these 5 redrawn districts held a special
    election, pursuant to section 204.021 of the Texas Election Code. If any candidate received over 50%, they
    were elected. Otherwise, a runoff election in December would decide the seat.
  5. A special election was held to fill the unexpired term of Tom DeLay. Don Richardson (7,405 votes) and
    Shelley Sekula Gibbs (76,924 votes) ran as Republicans in the special election and as Write-in candidates
    in the general election for the 22nd District. Sekula Gibbs won the special election and was sworn in
    November 13, 2006, representing the district for the few remaining weeks of the 109th Congress. Lampson
    won the general election and was sworn in on January 4, 2007.
  6. Reflects votes cast in the general election.
  7. Reflects votes cast in the runoff election held on December 12, 2006.
  8. No candidate.
  9. According to state law, it is not required to tabulate votes for unopposed candidates.
  10. Louisiana holds an open-primary election with candidates from
    all parties running on the same ballot. Any candidate who receives
    a majority is elected; if no candidate receives 50 percent, there
    is a run-off election in November between the top two finishers.
    A candidate who is unopposed is declared elected by the people and his/her name shall not appear
    on the ballot in either the Primary or General Election.
  11. Sanders, an Independent, was elected in 2002 & 2004 (with 69.2 percent of the vote in 2000, 64.3
    percent of the vote in 2002, and 67.5 percent of the vote in 2004).
  12. In 2002, Goode, an Independent, was elected in the Virginia 5th with 67.4 percent of the vote.

License

Public Domain (Government Work)

This dataset was prepared by the government and is therefore in the public domain. There are no restrictions upon its use.