Dataset

Households and Persons Having Problems with Access to Food:

Added By Infochimps

The Statistical Abstract files are distributed by the US Census Department as Microsoft Excel files. These files have data mixed with notes and references, multiple tables per sheet, and, worst of all, the table headers are not easily matched to their rows and columns.

A few files had extraneous characters in the title. These were corrected to be consistent. A few files have a sheet of crufty gibberish in the first slot. The sheet order was shuffled but no data were changed.

The tables that were changed (this is table 202):

0166 0257 0362 0429 0445 0446 0459 0461 0462 0464 0465 0466 0467
0469 0479 0480 0481 0482 0483 0484 0485 0486 0487 0559 0628 0629
1144 1227 1231

This dataset consists of a table of 32 rows and 13 columns.

Food-secure means that a household had access at all times to enough food for an active healthy life for all household members, with no need for recourse to socially unacceptable food sources or extraordinary coping behaviors to meet their basic food needs. Food-insecure households had limited or uncertain ability to acquire acceptable foods in socially acceptable ways. Households with very low food security (a subset of food-insecure households) were those in which food intake of one or more household members was reduced and normal eating patterns disrupted due to inadequate resources for food. The severity of food insecurity in households is measured through a series of questions about experiences and behaviors known to characterize households that are having difficulty meeting basic food needs. These experiences and behaviors generally occur in an ordered sequence as the severity of food insecurity increases. As resources become more constrained, adults in typical households first worry about having enough food, then they stretch household resources and juggle other necessities, then decrease the quality and variety of household members’ diets, then decrease the frequency and quantity of adults’ food intake, and finally decrease the frequency and quantity of children’s food intake. All questions refer to the previous 12 months and include a qualifying phrase reminding respondents to report only those occurrences that resulted from inadequate financial resources. Restrictions to food intake due to dieting or busy schedules are excluded. The omission of homeless persons may be a cause of underreporting. Data are from the Food Security Supplement to the Current Population Survey (CPS); for details about the CPS, see text, Section 1, Population, and Appendix III

Footnotes

  1. Prior to 2006, USDA described these households as food insecure without hunger.
  2. Food intake of one or more members in these households was reduced
    and normal eating patterns disruped at some time during the year
    because of the household’s food insecurity. Prior to 2006, USDA
    described these households as food insecure with hunger.
  3. Food intake of one or more children in these households was reduced
    and their normal eating patterns were disrupted at some time during the
    year because of the household’s food insecurity. Prior to 2006, USDA
    described these households as food insecure with hunger among children.
    Percent distribution of households with very low food security among children
    excludes households with no child from the denominator.

License

Public Domain (Government Work)

This dataset was prepared by the government and is therefore in the public domain. There are no restrictions upon its use.